Health and Well-being

A fully qualified School Nurse is available throughout the academic year. In conjunction with the pastoral team and academic staff, the nurse in closely involved in offering personalised care. The nurse also offers initial counselling and can advise and signpost students and parents to services that will provide specialist support.

The School in conjunction with the Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland Primary Care Trusts provides a vaccination programme in line with government guidelines.

We also have a school counsellor who offers support to students dealing with emotional health and wellbeing issues. Appointments are made on a referral basis via school nurse or a House Manager. 

All meetings are confidential unless a referral is required to an outside agency. Parents would always be informed if this deemed necessary.

Your Health and Well-being

Below is information about various areas of that you need to work on to keep healthy:

Healthy Eating

Exercise

Sleep Well

Health Matters

If you have concerns about your health, there are people you can go to for advice. Remember, by ‘Health’ we mean your body and your mind. You may be physically well but anxious, or unhappy. So, where can you get help or support?

  • Your parents
  • An adult you trust
  • Your tutor
  • House Managers
  • School Nurse: ChatHealth Text Service 07520 615 378 – available to 11-19 yr olds Monday – Friday 9am-4pm
  • Websites such as KidsHealth.org or NHS LiveWell

Healthy Eating

Eating a healthy, balanced diet is an important part of maintaining good health, and can help you feel your best. It can be simple, too. Just follow these eight tips to get started.
The two keys to a healthy diet are:

  • Eat the right number of calories for how active you are, so that you balance the energy you consume with the energy you use.
  • If you eat or drink too much, you’ll put on weight. If you eat too little you’ll lose weight. The average man needs around 2,500 calories a day. The average woman needs 2,000 calories. Most adults are eating more calories than they need, and should eat fewer calories.  For teenagers (11-14 yrs) it is slightly lower, with boys needing 2,220 and girls 1,845 calories per day.
  • Eat a wide range of foods to ensure that you’re getting a balanced diet and that your body is receiving all the nutrients it needs.

Try to follow these 8 simple guidelines:

  • Base your meals on starchy foods
  • Eat lots of fruit and veg
  • Eat more fish
  • Cut down on saturated fat and sugar
  • Eat less salt
  • Get active and be a healthy weight
  • Don’t get thirsty
  • Don’t skip breakfast

More information is available at the NHS Live Well Hub

Exercise

Everyone can benefit from regular exercise. people who are active will:

  • have stronger muscles and bones
  • have a leaner body because exercise helps control body fat
  • be less likely to become overweight
  • decrease the risk of developing type 2 diabetes
  • possibly lower blood pressure and blood cholesterol levels
  • have a better outlook on life

Besides enjoying the health benefits of regular exercise, teenagers who are physically fit sleep better and are better able to handle physical and emotional challenges — from running to catch a bus to studying for a test.

Finding an activity they are interested in can be tough, but there are a whole range of activity experiences available, just find one that suits. Look at the local leisure centre or community centre at what courses and activities they offer. Even going out on a bike ride or for a walk in the evenings can help!

Sleep Well

Most teens need about 8½ to more than 9 hours of sleep each night. The right amount of sleep is essential for anyone who wants to do well on a test or play sports without tripping over their feet. Unfortunately, though, many teens don’t get enough sleep.

Until recently, teens were often given a bad rap for staying up late, oversleeping for school, and falling asleep in class. But recent studies show that adolescent sleep patterns actually differ from those of adults or kids.

These studies show that during the teen years, the body’s circadian rhythm (sort of like an internal biological clock) is temporarily reset, telling a person to fall asleep later and wake up later. This change in the circadian rhythm seems to be due to the fact that the brain hormone melatonin is produced later at night for teens than it is for kids and adults. This can make it harder for teens to fall asleep early.

These changes in the body’s circadian rhythm coincide with a time when we’re busier than ever. For most teens, the pressure to do well in school is more intense than when they were kids, and it’s harder to get by without studying hard. And teens also have other time demands — everything from sports and other extracurricular activities to fitting in a part-time job to save money for college.

Early start times in some schools may also play a role in this sleep deficit. Teens who fall asleep after midnight may still have to get up early for school, meaning that they may only squeeze in 6 or 7 hours of sleep a night. A couple hours of missed sleep a night may not seem like a big deal, but can create a noticeable sleep deficit over time.

How do I know if I’m getting enough?  

You are not if you experience any of the following:

  • difficulty waking up in the morning
  • inability to concentrate
  • falling asleep during classes
  • feelings of moodiness and even depression

It is essential that students are prepared for a day of learning. Their minds need to be fully focussed and awake.  Here are some things that may help you to sleep better:

  • Set a regular bedtime.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Avoid stimulants. (Coffee, fizzy drinks, energy drinks)
  • Relax your mind. Unwind by keeping the lights low.
  • Don’t nap too much.
  • Avoid all-nighters.
  • Create the right sleeping environment.
  • Wake up with bright light.

NHS – Junk Sleep

Health Matters

Please see below links to useful websites related to smoking, drugs and alcohol:

Talk to Frank
NHS Drug Information Minisite
NHS SmokeFree Advice and Support Service
Parent’s Handbook: Talking to your child about legal highs & club drugs

Conditions in School

Allergies: NHS Information | Anaphylaxis UK
Asthma: NHS Information | Asthma UK Advice Line (0800 121 6244)
Diabetes: NHS Information | Diabetes UK (0845 120 2960)
Epilepsy: NHS Information | Epilepsy Action (0808 800 5050)
Eczema: NHS Information | National Eczema Society (0800 0891122)

Infections in School

Health Protection Agency
NHS Direct
Immunisations